Introduction To QMS

What is QMS? You might have heard of the term – it is linked with the world of business (or to be more exact, with the world of successful businesses). The term basically refers to ‘Quality Management System’, and as you can grasp from the three words, it basically is a system that aims towards the management and enhancement of the quality of a business. To further break it down, what a QMS basically does is to ensure that any business rests upon a set of policies and instructions that allow it to maintain a constant level of quality. For example, a textile factory would incorporate QMS by formulating a set of policies, and a set of detailed manuals for every employee rank, that allow it to produce quality textiles that meet optimal consumer satisfaction.

The term QMS is often interchangeably used with the many international standards such as the quality assurance consultants at Southpac International Group and 9001; however, a distinction should be made between these two. The latter two standards are simply a set of guidelines on how to implement QMS – they are not the system per se. accordingly, a business that has been certified by one of these standards, is basically a company that abides by a quality management system as per the guidelines of one of these standards.At the heart of QMS are basically the following components:

  • A documentation of all inputs-related requirements, which basically refers to manuals, guides, tutorials and other forms of documentation that aim to adequately and precisely describe how employees are to achieve their work contributions.
  • Adequate training and management of employees in order to ensure that they follow up on their required inputs. This includes everything from newbie work camps to the use diploma quality auditing of OHS consultant to estimate the working conditions of employees.
  • A constant documentation of all work processes which aims to provide records and evidence of a continued quality work. The various record-keeping of all departments and secretaries are included here.
  • Regular investigations of the work and quality of work. The annual audits that most companies undertake both internally and externally are included here; they serve as evidence of the company abiding by its stated policies of quality.
  • Continuous attempts at betterment and adaptation, which are based on largely two points: that is, that every work process of a business is never at its ‘perfected’ or ‘ultimate’ form (i.e. it can be further improved upon), and that the company has to constantly change to adapt to the changing society (i.e. accordingly, its input requirements, training regimes and just about every work process can and eventually will be subjected to change).